Brotherhood – A Matter of Accessibility

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Brotherhood – A Matter of Accessibility

by Midnight Freemason Contributor
RW Robert H. Johnson


"Text me, call me or email me, 24 hours a day, 365."That's what I tell every brother I know. I have made it a point to make myself accessible at all hours to my brothers. Some say, "Family first!" I agree, brothers are my family. I have found that making sure my brothers know I am willing to help anytime, is a crucial step in them understanding that this isn't a superficial relationship. In fact, there are moments when these men are shocked because of the attention and response they get when they put a call out.

We've all been there, we say, "Call me if you need anything." How many people say this, willy nilly? Openly or secretly hoping the person doesn't call on them. Of course it's human nature to want to be selfish and ignore a phone call, not respond to a text, or just outright ignore the person reaching out. We're human. But also, as a fraternity, we're above this.

How about when you're all sitting around late at night, you've all had a few drinks and everyone starts making plans to do something, and in the morning no one remembers. Conversations in which no one has any intention of doing what is proposed. Except, Freemasonry is different. What we propose, we perform. Especially when we offer assistance.

Recently, I told a brother I didn't need anything while my wife and I spent the night in the hospital with our youngest son. The next day I woke up in the hospital to a text message received at 8am. "They won't let me in, I have some breakfast for you guys." It was 9:15. I walked to the doors which lead out into the waiting area, and the brother was STILL there waiting. We shook hands, and he handed me a bag of breakfast items. We shared a few words before he took off and went about his day. It was Christmas Eve.

Emotional thoughts invaded my mind. In the current turmoil which we had just been through, my brother, who saw through my dismissal of help and reached out anyway, made me feel as if any doubts I had in this fraternity were wrongly placed. That breakfast was great, even if we was in the hospital.

Let this be a warning to those new brothers and to men thinking about joining. If we say we'll be there, we will. If you ask for assistance, we'll be there.

Oh, and one last thing. Thanks, Scott.

~RHJ

by Midnight Freemason Contributor
RW Robert H. Johnson


“Text me, call me or email me, 24 hours a day, 365.”That’s what I tell every brother I know. I have made it a point to make myself accessible at all hours to my brothers. Some say, “Family first!” I agree, brothers are my family. I have found that making sure my brothers know I am willing to help anytime, is a crucial step in them understanding that this isn’t a superficial relationship. In fact, there are moments when these men are shocked because of the attention and response they get when they put a call out.

We’ve all been there, we say, “Call me if you need anything.” How many people say this, willy nilly? Openly or secretly hoping the person doesn’t call on them. Of course it’s human nature to want to be selfish and ignore a phone call, not respond to a text, or just outright ignore the person reaching out. We’re human. But also, as a fraternity, we’re above this.

How about when you’re all sitting around late at night, you’ve all had a few drinks and everyone starts making plans to do something, and in the morning no one remembers. Conversations in which no one has any intention of doing what is proposed. Except, Freemasonry is different. What we propose, we perform. Especially when we offer assistance.

Recently, I told a brother I didn’t need anything while my wife and I spent the night in the hospital with our youngest son. The next day I woke up in the hospital to a text message received at 8am. “They won’t let me in, I have some breakfast for you guys.” It was 9:15. I walked to the doors which lead out into the waiting area, and the brother was STILL there waiting. We shook hands, and he handed me a bag of breakfast items. We shared a few words before he took off and went about his day. It was Christmas Eve.

Emotional thoughts invaded my mind. In the current turmoil which we had just been through, my brother, who saw through my dismissal of help and reached out anyway, made me feel as if any doubts I had in this fraternity were wrongly placed. That breakfast was great, even if we was in the hospital.

Let this be a warning to those new brothers and to men thinking about joining. If we say we’ll be there, we will. If you ask for assistance, we’ll be there.

Oh, and one last thing. Thanks, Scott.

~RHJ